Cal Lane

September 16, 2016 September 18, 2016

Kristen Dodge and Cal Lane first worked together in Boston in 2008, and are excited to be collaborating again for Lane’s installation at Basilica, Hudson during Soundscape, September 2016. Working with the raw architecture of the factory’s steel beams and industrial artifacts, Lane will install her rusted and cut i-beams, oil barrels, and steel drums. Installed both in the Basilica’s main room and an outside site, Lane’s plasma cut forms will integrate and disrupt. Custom lighting will cast laced shadows, blurring the viewer’s sense of the interior and exterior of the objects themselves, and of the surrounding context. The topics of her forms are panties, Persian rugs, and dancing devils.

Lane incises industrial objects with clashing, detailed imagery that recalls maps, medieval tapestries, architectural ornamentation, and bodily adornment. Notable works include I-beams cut into towers of lace, wheelbarrows converted into intricate doilies, a crushed automobile transmuted into patterned drapery, ammunition boxes split open and amended with narrative, and most recently oil tanks donned with laced panties. Lane often characterizes her work as industrial doilies rigorously and humorously demonstrating a “tasteless relationship of images.” She is interested in toying with oppositions, depleting the functionality of implicated objects and repositioning them as sites of aesthetic play.

“I am drawn to the relationships of industrial and domestic, as well as the physical and mental properties of strong and delicate, masculine and feminine, practical and frivolity, ornament and function. Lace intrigues me- its associations of hiding and exposing at the same time; like a veil to cover, or lingerie to reveal. It also introduces a kind of humor through the form of unexpected relationships, like a wrestler in a tutu. The absurdity of having opposing extremist stances prompts reaction and not rational understanding; the rational discussion arises in the search for how one thing defines the other by its proximity.”

  • Cal Lane

Cal Lane (b. 1968, Halifax, Nova Scotia) lives and works in Putnam Valley, NY. Lane received her BA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and her MFA from SUNY Purchase. Lane has exhibited extensively including the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery, Burlington City Arts (Burlington, VT), Hunter College (New York, NY), Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (Peekskill, NY), DeCordova Sculpture Park (Lincoln, MA), Foster Gallery, University of Wisconsin (Madison, WI), Museum of Art and Design (New York, NY), Musea Brugge (Brugge, Belgium), the Musée des Manufactures des Dentelles (France), The Museum of Craft and Design (San Francisco, CA), Musée des Tissus et des Arts décoratifs de Lyon (Lyon, FR), the Design Center at Philadelphia University (Philadelphia, PA), Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (Scottsdale, AZ), Socrates Sculpture Park (Long island City, NY), and the 18th Biennale de Sydney (Sydney, Australia). She was commissioned by MTA Arts & Design to install a major work at the Knickerbocker Station, Brooklyn, NY. Lane has been the recipient of several fellowships including, Canada Council for the Arts, Nova Scotia Talent Trust Award, Socrates Sculpture Park Fellowship, and Steckler Scholarship For The Arts. Lane’s work has been covered by ArtForum, Art News, New York Times, and Sculpture Magazine, among others. In the fall of 2016, Lane will have a solo exhibition at ArtMur in Leipzig, Germany.